Our Presenters

Registration

Registration (includes lunch) $10

Registration- Youth Workshop (includes lunch) FREE

Registration (including lunch and T-shirt) $25

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Keynote Speaker


Kayleigh is a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, and the namesake and successful stakeholder in the legislative process that eventually was passed in Arizona Called Kayleigh’s law.  Kayleigh’s law provides survivors of specific criminal offenses the right to a lifetime no-contact injunction order from the court.  Arizona is the first State in the nation to offer this to crime victims. 

She will be sharing her unique story with us that drive’s her to continue to stand up and demand change for victims and survivors.  She will be sharing information about Kayleigh’s law, who can access this order, and how we are involved in advocating and working with crime victims collaboratively to ensure victims are offered this protection. 

 Resources: Kayleigh's Website      |    AZ Courts: Lifetime No-Contact Injunctions

Amy Bocks

Amy holds a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Arizona and a Master’s of Education from Northern Arizona University. Amy began her work with victims in 2001 working with the victims of juvenile offenders and joined the Office of Victim Services in 2004. She supervises advocates and staff, works on polices, program development and performance, writes grants and oversees OVS’ grant monitoring and reporting to ensure continued funding and program development. She has worked on legislation and state-wide policies directing affecting victim and survivors. In 2017 Amy was awarded the Attorney General’s Michael C. Cudahy Award for Mentoring. She has taught classes and trainings, and conducted presentations on Victims’ Rights, victimology, and volunteer program management for the Arizona Victim Assistance Academy, the Arizona Prosecuting Attorneys’ Advisory Council and the Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith and Family. Amy is the Chair of the Arizona Coalition for Victim Services (ACVS) and serves as a Pima County Victim Compensation Board member.

Restitution: A Right to Recovery: Dealing with Financial Loss

Workshop Description: The need for restitution is a common theme for victims regardless of crime type. A Right to Recovery: Dealing with Financial Loss provides a more in-depth look at restitution in the State of Arizona and will help the participant apply their new knowledge of the process and victims’ rights in their work or as a community member. Following the workshop. Participants will be able to identify key issues in the restitution process, understand how to use tools to overcome potential barriers in claims, orders and collection efforts, and be able to identify and fine additional resources. At the end of the workshop, participants will apply what they learned while discussing common restitution scenarios.

Master Sergeant Tommy Morga 

Master Sergeant Tommy Morga has been a member of the Arizona National Guard Drug Demand Reduction and Outreach (DDRO) team for the past four and half years and has been a part of the United States Air Force for almost twenty years.  The experience gained throughout his military career allows him to carry that over to his work on DDRO as a national and local instructor. 

Master Sergeant Tommy Morga is a team leader within DDRO as well as the liaison between DDRO and the Arizona High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA).  At the AZ HIDTA, Master Sergeant Tommy Morga works alongside the Demand Reduction Coordinator to help bring prevention strategies and resources to the state of Arizona as well as nationally. 

Master Sergeant Tommy Morga uses his expertise as an instructor to bring an array of prevention presentations to the state to youth, as well as adults.  The main presentations given for adults are the Rise of Fentanyl and “The Newest Drug Dealing Trends” which highlights the use of social media to sell drugs to youth. 

The Newest Drug Dealing Trends

 Workshop Description: This presentation focuses on social media and how it has become the newest arena of drug dealing. It provides an in-depth look into how youth are obtaining illegal substances through social media, specifically Snapchat as it has a large appeal to youth due to its anonymity and ease of communication styles. Resources will also be provided to adults to enhance the safety of youth in their care and/or in the community.

ACESDV- Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence

Lauryn Fjell is a Domestic Violence Response Coordinator at the Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence. In this role, she provides trainings and technical assistance to domestic violence programs and other service providers. Lauryn is passionate about LGBTQ+ and BIPOC issues, as well as ensuring that survivors are receiving trauma informed services. She has worked in the anti-violence movement since 2020, and has experience as an advocate, case manager, and a supervisor in a domestic violence shelter. Other than general technical assistance, Lauryn specializes in the provision of trauma informed, survivor-centered advocacy and case management, as well as shelter policy and form revision. Lauryn holds a Bachelor’s degree in Behavioral Health Science, and is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Social Work at Arizona State University. When she has free time, Lauryn enjoys reading, crafting, and spending time outdoors with her partner and their two dogs.

ACESDV advocates for comprehensive responses for domestic and sexual violence survivors at the local, state, and national levels. The Coalition serves as the primary provider of training and technical assistance for domestic and sexual violence programs in Arizona on best practices, programming, and administration, and advocates on behalf of programs and survivors in public policy advocacy efforts.

We know Intimate partner and gun violence in the US are inextricably linked.  Harm-doers with firearms are five times more likely to kill their female victims, and possession of a gun exacerbates power and control dynamics. The statistics on the prevalence of intimate partner homicide with a firearm are staggering: an average of 70 women are shot and killed every month in the United States. This training will challenge us, agencies and partners who work with domestic violence victims to learn the facts surrounding these issues, and look at our current systems to evaluate their effectiveness. It will also address safety planning for survivors who wish to own a firearm, and challenge us to become more comfortable talking about gun safety with survivors. Lastly, this presentation will encourage us to move forward as a local community to create change.

The Use of Firearms in Domestic Violence 

 Workshop Description: We know Intimate partner and gun violence in the US are inextricably linked.  Harm-doers with firearms are five times more likely to kill their female victims, and possession of a gun exacerbates power and control dynamics. The statistics on the prevalence of intimate partner homicide with a firearm are staggering: an average of 70 women are shot and killed every month in the United States. This training will challenge us, agencies and partners who work with domestic violence victims to learn the facts surrounding these issues, and look at our current systems to evaluate their effectiveness. It will also address safety planning for survivors who wish to own a firearm, and challenge us to become more comfortable talking about gun safety with survivors. Lastly, this presentation will encourage us to move forward as a local community to create change.  

Parents of Murdered Children

Victim Impact Panel: Homicide Survivors

Harley Feldman

Harley Feldman has a long career in technology development and sales.  On February 17, 2015, his 31-year-old daughter, Allison, was murdered in her home in Scottsdale, Arizona.  Allison was a very sweet girl, was a Burn Specialist and had many friends from work and in her personal life.  Her loss has had a devastating impact on the family.

Allison’s case was solved using Familial DNA Search (FS) which matches family DNA to help solve crimes.  FS was not legal in Arizona when Allison’s case was being analyzed.  He worked with people in the legislature and the Arizona Attorney General and Governor to make the technology legal in the state.  Allison’s case was the first to use the FS technology, and her murderer was found.  The fact that her case was solved was heartening to Harley and his family even though Allison’s loss was very difficult.

Harley has become the Coordinator for the West Suburban Grief Coalition, the largest grief group in the Twin Cities. Coordinator means that Harley finds weekly speakers for the coalition and is a facilitator for the Child Loss Group within the coalition.

Harley believes that he can help people who have suffered the loss of their child either through helping them with FS in their states or through personal thoughts and strategies with POMC.

Kim Bryssellbout

Parents of Murdered Children Co-Leader of the Valley of the Sun Chapter for 2 years.  She is a mother whose daughter was a victim of homicide.  I will be speaking from my heart about my daughter Savannah and the circumstances of her murder. I was just beginning to grieve her fully when I was asked to take over the Valley of The Sun Chapter. I stepped in because the chapter had given me so much love and support, I needed to see it continued to do this for the countless new survivors that join out ranks every month. For me POMC means hope. Without that we would not survive. 


Parents of Murdered Children

Victim Impact Panel: Homicide Survivors

 Workshop Description: This presentation will provide the attendees with a firsthand account from survivors who have lost a loved one to violence.  To often our system focuses on the accused and forgets about those left behind who are innocent victims of crime.  The presentation will also give an overview of Parents Of Murdered Children, Valley of the Sun and Arizona Crime Victim Rights Law Group.   The presentation will allow the audience to learn firsthand about our loved ones and our fight for justice.